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History

History is all around us. The study of history ignites student’s curiosity about the past in Britain and the wider world.

Through finding out about how and why the world, our country, culture and local community have developed over time, students understand how the past influences the present.

 
 
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A people without a 

knowledge of their past 

history, knowledge and 

culture is like a tree 

without roots. 

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Marcus Garvey

History enables students to develop a context for their growing sense of identity and a chronological framework for their knowledge of significant events and people.

 

What they learn through history can teach them about resilience and a respect for the people and events that shaped key turning points in our past.  Our intent is that our students will be offered a curriculum which is academically rigorous but also helps them to develop into well informed, curious young people who can reason, debate and challenge the world around them.  We provide a sequenced history curriculum that inspires curiosity, scholarship and the capacity for students to develop their understanding. Our curriculum has a clear focus on skills and knowledge progression, from year seven through to eventual A Level, we are developing core historical skills like source analysis, evaluating Interpretations, cause and consequence, significance, discursive writing and second order concepts like change and continuity. This ensures that skills and knowledge are built on year by year.

What are they learning?

Year 7


Students will be developing core historical skills like source analysis, evaluating Interpretations, cause and consequence, significance, discursive writing and second order concepts like change and continuity. We ensure that skills and knowledge are built on year by year and sequenced appropriately. Areas Studied: What was the relationship between the Rulers and Ruled 1066-1500 How and why has Rugby developed over time? Local History Study Who should be king? – 1066 Key Concepts and themes: Power: Daily Lives How far was 1066 a turning point in British History? Crusades, case studies of rulers like the Empress Matilda Key Concepts and themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/ War and Peace How did life compare for the rulers and ruled of Medieval Britain? Key Concepts and themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/ Daily Lives How diverse was Tudor Society? Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/ Daily Lives How was the World turned upside down by the English Civil War? Key Concepts and themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/ Daily Lives/ War and Peace What was Africa like before 1500? Key Concepts and themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/ Daily Lives/ War and Peace




Year 9


In Year we study their Crime and Punishment unit exploring the nature of crime, causes of crime and how law enforcement, trials and punishments were organised. This unit will take students on a journey from Anglo Saxon Britain right through to the present day. They will also complete an investigation into crime and punishment in the Whitechapel area of London from 1870-1900 Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present and Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city.




Potential Careers relating to your subject


Academic Researcher/ Archivist / Heritage Manager / Historian / Historic Buildings Inspector/Conservation Officer / Museum Education Officer / Museum/Gallery Curator / Museum/Gallery Exhibitions Officer / Secondary School Teacher / Lecturer / Researcher / Academic Librarian / Archaeologist / Barrister / Broadcast Journalist / Civil Service Administrator / Editorial Assistant / Human Resources Officer / Information Officer / Marketing / Media / Policy Officer / Police / Politics / Solicitor




Year 8


In year 8 we continue to build on the core historical skills like source analysis, evaluating Interpretations, cause and consequence, significance, discursive writing and second order concepts like change and continuity. This ensures that skills and knowledge are built on year by year. Areas Studied: How can people be discriminatory? Why did Britain support the Transatlantic Slave Trade? Key Concepts and Themes: Power/ Freedom and rights / Daily Lives Which people and events lead the fight for civil rights? Key Concepts and Themes: Freedom and Rights/Gender Suffragettes – Did they break or make the law? How did WW1 become a global war? Key Concepts and Themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/War and Peace/ Daily lives What were the consequences of the Treaty of Versailles? Key Concepts and Themes: Power/ Rights and Freedom/ War and Peace/ Daily Lives What was lifelike in Nazi Germany? What was the Holocaust? Key Concepts and Themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/War and Peace/ Daily lives How did society change in the years after WW2? Key Concepts and Themes: Power/Freedom and Rights/Gender/War and Peace/ Daily lives




GCSE


History GCSE provides an opportunity for our students to develop and extend their knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in local, British, and wider world history; and of the wide diversity of human experience. This is achieved through the study of diverse and contrasting periods of history. The course begins with a study of crime and punishment over time with a focus on new and changing definitions of crime and the means by which society has attempted to enforce the law, conduct trials and serve punishments. Studies continue with the history of the 19th century American West, The Early Elizabethans and Weimar and Nazi Germany. Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment: Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present and Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city. Paper 2: Period study and British depth study (Paper codes: B4 Early Elizabethans and 24/25 American West ) Paper 3: Modern depth study (Paper codes: 1HI0 31) Weimar and Nazi Germany





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